Radioman: An Eyewitness Account of Pearl Harbor and World War II in the Pacific
                           
                                            Chapter 19.  "Cold Bay"
      
                      
Bonus Photos--not among the 42 included in the book  
                                               
                                                 More Bonus Photos

Radioman: An Eyewitness Account of Pearl Harbor and World War II in the Pacific


Chapter 1  "The Tree Army"

Chapter 2  "Joining the Navy"

Chapter 3.  "Basic Training"   

Chapter 4   "The Destroyer"  

Chapter  5  "Radio School"     

Chapter 6.  "The Cruiser"

Chapter 7.  "The Submarine Base"  

Chapter 8.  "The Attack on Pearl Harbor"  

Chapter 9.  "Aftershocks"  

Chapter 10.  "The Submarine"     

Chapter 11.  "The Aircraft Carrier"        

Chapter 12.  "The Battle of Coral Sea"                 

Chapter 13.  "The Battle of Midway"                      

Chapter 14.  "Abandon Ship"                               

Chapter 15.  "Rescued at Sea"                              

Chapter 16.  "The Summer of '42"                        

Chapter 17.  "First Leave"                                     

Chapter 18.  "The Naval Research Laboratory"   

Chapter 19.  "Cold Bay"                                        Current page, see photos above  

Chapter 20.  "Kodiak"                                             

Chapter 21.  "Victory Days"                                    

Epilogue
Aleut fishermen greet Merchant Marine vessels and U.S. Navy warships in the harbor at Cold Bay on
Alaska's Aleutian peninsula, July 1943.

     Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 161
                                   Source of Photo:  Ray Daves Collection
Tundra dominates the landscape between the harbor at Cold Bay and the Naval Auxiliary Air Field
(NAAF) located miles inland on the Aleutian peninsula.  Summer 1943.  

   Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 162
                              Source of Photo:  Ray Daves Collection
With its characteristic "Aleutian Tigers" nose art, this Army Air Force P-40 "Warhawk"
fighter plane is on the runway at NAAF (Naval Auxiliary Air Field) Cold Bay, 1943.

    Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 162  
                       
Source of Photo:  Ray Daves Collection
Early versions of the US Army Air Force B-24 "Liberator" heavy bomber were obtained by the Navy for
transport and utility use, such as this PB4Y-1 at NAAF Cold Bay in the summer of 1943.

     Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 162
                         Source of Photo:  Ray Daves Collection
Hat Tip:  Aviation Historian/Photographer
William T. Larkins for identification of the plane
Navy radiomen and torpedomen assigned to NAAF Cold Bay bunked together in this Quonset hut
they called "Paradise Lost."  (Radioman Ray Daves is front, kneeling at right.) Summer 1943.  

Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 162
                    Source of Photo:  Ray Daves Collection
US Navy radiomen and torpedomen relax together inside Paradise Lost when not on
duty at NAAF Cold Bay, Summer 1943.  

Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 162
              Source of Photo:  Ray Daves Collection
US Navy torpedomen prepare a torpedo for transport from the inland warehouse on the Aleutian
peninsula to warships in the harbor at Cold Bay.  Fall 1943.   

    Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 163
                           Source of Photo:  Ray Daves Collection
The dock at Cold Bay facilitated the delivery of ammunition and supplies between the warehouses at
NAAF Cold Bay and US Navy warships operating among Alaska's Aleutian Islands during World War II.
 
   Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 163
                        Source of Photo:  Ray Daves Collection
              
From their base at NAAF Cold Bay in 1943, a pair of OS2U "Kingfisher" planes fly search-and-destroy missions
against Japanese submarines in Alaskan waters.  Radioman (RM1c) Ray Daves took this photo from the rear seat of
the plane in the foreground.  One bomb is visible in the rack beneath the plane's wing.

         
Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 167    
                                
Source of Photo:  Ray Daves Collection
This US Navy pilot at NAAF Cold Bay was nicknamed "Fish" by Radioman Ray Daves and others who
served as his rear seat gunner during aerial search-and-destroy missions in the Aleutian Islands, 1943.

 Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 168
                       Source of Photo:  Ray Daves Collection
One of the many thousands of "Kiri leaflets" dropped by American bombers on
Japanese-occupied islands in the Aleutians in 1943 is shown in its actual size and color.  

Above object illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 169
          (See page 170 for translation of the leaflet's wording.)
                     Source of Object:  Ray Daves Collection
                            Reverse side of the same kiri leaflet.  

Translation appears on page 171 of Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay")
Radioman (RM1c) Ray Daves,23, in cold weather flight gear,  NAAF Cold Bay, Fall/Winter 1943.  
 
       Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 171
                               Source of Photo:  Ray Daves Collection
Radioman Ray Daves, 23, is dressed for an Aleutian williwaw at Naval Auxiliary
Air Field (NAAF) Cold Bay, Fall/Winter 1943.   

Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 171
                 Source of Photo:  Ray Daves Collection
 
Radioman Ray Daves, 23, and a torpedoman at NAAF Cold Bay brave the winter of 1943
on Alaska's Aleutian peninsula.  (Flashing the "V for Victory" sign with index and middle
finger was popular among Americans and other Allied forces during World War II.)

 
Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 171
                      Source of Photo:  Ray Daves Collection
"Sweetheart" was the name given to the plane that brought the mail to sailors stationed at Cold Bay in
1943.  It is a Martin JM-1, an unarmed version of the Army Air Force's B-26 Martin "Marauder" medium
bomber.  ("J" was the Navy's designation for utility planes; "M" indicates the manufacturer, Martin.)    

              Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 173
                                Source of Photo:  Ray Daves Collection
Hat Tip:  Aviation Historian/Photographer
William T. Larkins for identification of the plane
Navy torpedoman (and artist) Hector Lebree "rides" a torpedo out of the warehouse.
               Naval Auxiliary Air Field Cold Bay, 1943.   

Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 175
                Source of Photo:  Ray Daves Collection
To the amusement of his bunkmates, a Navy torpedoman under the influence of torpedo fuel--"torpedo juice"--stands
guard at the door of the Quonset hut dubbed "Paradise Lost."  NAAF Cold Bay, 1943.  (Helmet and rifle are both
World War I-era, frequently issued to US military personnel during World War II.)

           Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 176
                                      Source of Photo:  Ray Daves Collection
The interior of the Officers' Club at NAAF Cold Bay featured "The Girl on the Beach," a wall mural
painted by torpedoman Hector Lebree, 1943.

        Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 176
                             Source of Photo:  Ray Daves Collection
A closer view of "The Girl on the Beach" by torpedoman/artist Hector Lebree, NAAF Cold Bay, 1943.

        
Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 176
                             Source of Photo:  Ray Daves Collection
In a typical mess hall initiation for newly appointed Chief Petty Officers, Denis Mikkelsen (left, center)
and others eat their last meal as First Class Petty Officers from troughs with oven mitts for utensils.  1945.

           Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 178
                              Source of Photo:  Denis Mikkelsen Collection
The 1897-built US Coast Guard cutter Algonquin (CG-4/RC), was decommissioned in 1930 and sold to a
Seattle business in 1931.   This photo, dated June 26, 1943, shows
Algonquin after she was acquired by the
Navy and designated YAG-29 for service in Alaskan waters during World War II.  

               
Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 178
                                Source of Photo:  National Archives # 19-N-46832        
            The Officers' Club, Naval Auxiliary Air Field (NAAF) Cold Bay, 1943.  

       
Above photo illustrates Radioman, Chapter 19 ("Cold Bay"), page 176
                             Source of Photo:  Ray Daves Collection
Bonus Photos for All Other Chapters:  
[1]   [2]   [3]   [4]   [5]   [6]   [7]   [8]   [9]   [10]   [11]   [12]   [13]   [14]   [15]   [16]   [17]   [18]   [19]   [20]   [21]  [Epilogue]

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